Thinking Torah | RSS Feed http://thinkingtorah.com Torah for everyday life Thu, 18 Jun 2015 08:35:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Rosh Chodesh Tammuz http://thinkingtorah.com/rosh-chodesh-tammuz/ http://thinkingtorah.com/rosh-chodesh-tammuz/#comments Thu, 18 Jun 2015 08:31:25 +0000 http://thinkingtorah.com/?p=1869 Today is Rosh Chodesh Tammuz. Unfortunately, this day makes my wife sad. She looks at her calendar and all she sees is the looming 3 Weeks from the 17th of Tammuz until Tisha B’Av. So the I’m writing this article to cheer her up. When I want a deeper understanding of the Jewish months I […]

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Today is Rosh Chodesh Tammuz. Unfortunately, this day makes my wife sad.

She looks at her calendar and all she sees is the looming 3 Weeks from the 17th of Tammuz until Tisha B’Av.

So the I’m writing this article to cheer her up.

When I want a deeper understanding of the Jewish months I delve into Seasons of Life – The Reflection of the Jewish Year in the Natural World by Rabbi Natan Slifkin.

I was confident that he would point out the many positive aspects of Chodesh Tammuz.

I was wrong.

He begins:

The name Tamuz itself means “heat.” The blazing sun often raises the temperature to as much as 35C. Being outdoors for extended periods can be dangerous; precious body fluid is lost to the heat, leading to dehydration.

Then he lists the tragedies that occurred on the 17th of Tammuz through Jewish history:

  • Moshe broke the tablets when he came down from Har Sinai
  • the daily burnt offering was suspended
  • the walls of Jerusalem were breached by Titus
  • Apostemus (a Roman commander) burned a Torah scroll
  • an idol was erected in the Sanctuary of the Temple

Also, as is well known, on Tisha B’Av 5 tragedies befell the Jewish people.

Season-of-Life

The months of Tammuz and Av are a time of disconnect between the Jewish people and God.

One of the symbols of a proper relationship between heaven and earth is rain.

As Rav Slifkin writes:

When we turn away from Hashem, He prevents the rain from falling. The desired effect is to encourage our return to Him through fasting and prayer. In fact, the Talmudic tractate Ta’anis, which deals with fast days, does not center on the fasts of Yom Kippur and Tishah B’Av, as one might expect. These are left for the end. The main focus of the tractate is on fast days that have been instituted because of a lack of rain.

The essence of a fast day is to reestablish our connection with Hashem, the breakage of which is signified by lack of rain. A fast day is to be occupied with repentance and prayer, expressing a desire to relate to Hashem and to redress our former lack of communication.

It’s hard to find a good side to this time of year on the Jewish calendar.

In that sense, my purpose for writing this article failed.

However, it’s only when we begin to understand the problem that we can begin to find a solution.

Picture Credit: Pixabay.com

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Should Cars Be Outlawed? http://thinkingtorah.com/should-cars-be-outlawed/ http://thinkingtorah.com/should-cars-be-outlawed/#comments Tue, 16 Jun 2015 09:46:19 +0000 http://thinkingtorah.com/?p=1866 I had the privilege of learning Torah from several grandsons of Rav Yaakov Kamenetsky. One of them told me that his grandfather was convinced that Chazal would have decreed against cars. It’s not hard to make a compelling case that driving is too dangerous and should not be permitted. In 2009 (the latest US stats […]

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I had the privilege of learning Torah from several grandsons of Rav Yaakov Kamenetsky.

One of them told me that his grandfather was convinced that Chazal would have decreed against cars.

It’s not hard to make a compelling case that driving is too dangerous and should not be permitted.

In 2009 (the latest US stats I could find) 33,808 people were killed in motor vehicle accidents. Another two thousand died from their injuries during the next 11 months.

In addition, 2.2 million people in the US were injured in 10.8 million wrecks.

That’s quite a toll.

Even though Chazal did not ban driving, it still may be that driving will become a thing of the past.

The website Next Big Future has a compelling discussion of advances being made in driverless vehicles.

It seems driverless trucks will be first. It makes since that companies would want to lower their shipping costs. Since truck are used to deliver so many products, it makes sense to start there.

It’s true that many professional driving jobs will be lost.

But as the author observes:

Too bad for the drivers over the next few decades but I want my commute time automated and I want grandma to be independent and mobile and I want to save lives and reduce injury from accidents

I’ve never been fond of the “if only one life is saved” type of argument. I find that argument is used to justify all sorts of dumb ideas.

However, it does seem that driverless vehicles can save lives, reduce injuries, and save time and major medical expenses.

Adding up all costs related to accidents—including medical costs, property damage, loss of productivity, legal costs, travel delays and pain and lost quality of life—the American Automobile Association studied crash data in the 99 largest U.S. urban areas and estimated the total costs to be $299.5 billion.

Traffic congestion wasted 4.8 billion hours and 1.9 billion gallons of fuel a year for urban Americans. That translates to $101 billion in lost productivity and added fuel costs.

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Spanish Citizenship http://thinkingtorah.com/spanish-citizenship/ http://thinkingtorah.com/spanish-citizenship/#comments Mon, 15 Jun 2015 09:22:14 +0000 http://thinkingtorah.com/?p=1863 When I was in elementary school one of the dates we all memorized was 1492. The year Columbus sailed west from Spain and discovered America. It was many years later I learned about another significant event in 1492: the expulsion from Spain of the Jews. As recently reported in the Jerusalem Post: In 1492, the […]

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When I was in elementary school one of the dates we all memorized was 1492. The year Columbus sailed west from Spain and discovered America.

It was many years later I learned about another significant event in 1492: the expulsion from Spain of the Jews.

As recently reported in the Jerusalem Post:

In 1492, the Jews of the Iberian peninsula were presented with a choice – convert or accept exile. Those who left migrated to North Africa and the Middle East, while many of those who stayed became underground Jews, hiding their religion under the guise of devout Catholicism.

In recent years Spain has tried to make some amends for the expulsion.

In the latest step, Spain has passed a law allowing the descendants of those who were exiled to apply for Spanish citizenship.

Prospective citizens would have to prove their ancestry and prove they have a basic knowledge of Spain and its culture.

They will also be required to visit the country at least once and, according to reports, will be required to pay an application fee of 100 euros.

This new law raises many questions:

  • Are such symbolic gestures worthwhile?
  • Are there any real benefits to Spanish citizenship?
  • How does a person prove their ancestry?

Some observers think the law will be helpful to Sephardi Jews in countries such as Turkey and Venezuela where anti-Semitism is on the rise.

Will holding Spanish citizenship make it easier for some Jews to escape from oppression in their current countries? If so, then it’s a good thing.

I’ve been reading the spy novel The Fallen Angel by Daniel Silva. He includes this dialog on page 225:

“It would remind the world why we live in Israel instead of Germany and Poland.”

“The world doesn’t care,” Shamron responded with a dismissive wave of his hand. “And the Holocaust isn’t the only reason we have a home in the Land of Israel. We’re there because it was ours in the beginning. We belong there.”

“Even some of our friends aren’t so sure of that anymore.”

If the Spanish citizenship law helps some Jews connect more strongly with Judaism and Israel, then I applaud it.

However, if the law only helps Spain feel good, then there is no point in it.

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State Sponsored Arts http://thinkingtorah.com/state-sponsored-arts/ http://thinkingtorah.com/state-sponsored-arts/#comments Sun, 14 Jun 2015 19:05:43 +0000 http://thinkingtorah.com/?p=1860 Based on the outrage you would be forgiven for concluding that a serious crime has been committed. There is much gnashing of teeth and howls of outrage. It’s only to be expected since the ones feeling the outrage are actors and artists. Too bad they weren’t more careful about overacting. As reported in Arutz 7, […]

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Based on the outrage you would be forgiven for concluding that a serious crime has been committed.

There is much gnashing of teeth and howls of outrage.

It’s only to be expected since the ones feeling the outrage are actors and artists. Too bad they weren’t more careful about overacting.

As reported in Arutz 7, Artists Hold Emergency Sessions Against Culture Minister:

Hundreds of Israeli artists took part Sunday in emergency sessions at Yafo (Jaffa) Port and at the Haifa Port to protest what they claim are illegitimate decisions by the new government affecting their freedom.

They make it sound like they were all put behind bars.

The message they sent [minister Miri] Regev was a mixed one. They reportedly intend to deliver a summary of the sessions to the new culture minister, Miri Regev (Likud), in which they will ask to work in complete cooperation with her. At the same time, many of them delivered insults and told her she had no business telling them what to do with the funds they receive from the government.

It’s too bad they never realized until now that government funding comes with strings attached.

Three hundred artists from the film, theater, dance, literature and music industries signed a letter Sunday, “protesting the non-democratic measures taken by the Education and Culture Ministries against artists whose creative works or outlooks do not jive with the spirit in these offices.”

“We the undersigned are the voices you wish to silence,” the artists fired to conclude their letter. “We hope with all our hearts that Israel does not deteriorate and become a country in which artists who express their views are put on a ‘blacklist.'”

So many people confuse notions that should not be confused. The government deciding not to fund a project is not the same as censorship.

To censor a project is to declare it cannot be performed under any circumstances.

No one is saying the defunded projects can’t be performed. They’ll just have to do it without taxpayers’ shekels.

At the very least the government should not fund projects that involve Shabbat desecration.

Perhaps it would be best for the government to stop all funding of arts and crafts.

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Orange and Israel http://thinkingtorah.com/orange-and-israel/ http://thinkingtorah.com/orange-and-israel/#comments Wed, 10 Jun 2015 10:22:29 +0000 http://thinkingtorah.com/?p=1849 Recently the CEO of the French company Orange announced that he wanted his company to stop doing business in Israel. The Orange name is licensed in Israel by the Israeli company Partner. Not surprising, a frequent joke is “It seems like Partner needs a new partner.” Partner / Orange is the second largest cell phone […]

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Recently the CEO of the French company Orange announced that he wanted his company to stop doing business in Israel.

The Orange name is licensed in Israel by the Israeli company Partner. Not surprising, a frequent joke is “It seems like Partner needs a new partner.”

Partner / Orange is the second largest cell phone company in Israel.

Many of us who are customers immediately started considering if we should stop using Orange and switch to another one of the cell phone companies.

On the one hand, it doesn’t seem right to switch companies and hurt the Israeli employees of Partner.

On the other hand, do I want to deal with a company that has chosen to affiliate themselves with a foreign company that wants to harm Israel?

Another Aspect of the Story

Supporters of the position taken by Orange France claim that the company is right to sever its ties with Israel because the Israeli company provides phone service in the “disputed territories” in violation of international law.

There’s now a discussion of this issue in the Washington Post:

The French Ambassador to the U.S., (and formerly Israel), defended the Orange CEO’s statement on Twitter:‘
“4th Geneva convention : settlement policy in occupied territories is illegal. It is illegal to contribute to it in any way.”

The author of the Washington Post piece immediately responds:

That statement is entirely baseless. Even if settlements are illegal, there is no ban on business in the territories, or with settlers. Certainly there is no tertiary obligation to not do business with businesses that have some tangential business in such territory.

It seems there is ample legal basis that companies are permitted to operate in “disputed territories.”

Perhaps the most instructive aspect of this was the reaction of Amb. Araud, when I pointed out to him that his legal claim is baseless, and squarely contradicted by France’s own courts in recent decisions involving Israel, which held the Geneva Conventions flatly inapplicable to private companies. It is also contradicted by the opinions the U.N. Security Council Legal Advisor, the EU Parliament’s legal advisor, and the U.K. Supreme Court, and more.

Orange-in-Israel

Not surprising, the whole dispute comes down to this:

First, for something to be law, it has to be a rule that applies to similar situations. And for it to be international, well, those situations will involve different countries.

What the French apparently want is, to paraphrase Stalin, international law for one country. Ok. But don’t call it international. And don’t call it law.

Once again, Israel has the privilege of being singled out for special treatment.

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Jerusalem Light Show 2015 http://thinkingtorah.com/jerusalem-light-show-2015/ http://thinkingtorah.com/jerusalem-light-show-2015/#comments Fri, 05 Jun 2015 13:00:00 +0000 http://thinkingtorah.com/?p=1841 The 2015 Jerusalem Light Show is happening this week. We’ve been faithfully attending the Jerusalem Old City Light Show every year since 2012. The show is held in June which usually guarantees warm days and a nice cool breeze in the evening. This year we walked along the White Line and Red Line. The White […]

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The 2015 Jerusalem Light Show is happening this week.

We’ve been faithfully attending the Jerusalem Old City Light Show every year since 2012.

The show is held in June which usually guarantees warm days and a nice cool breeze in the evening.

This year we walked along the White Line and Red Line.

The White Line started at Shaar Yafo and ended at the parking lot next to the Jewish Quarter.

My favorite display along the White Line was the Lamp Shades. All of the lamp shades were decorated by children living in the Old City.

Lamp Shades in Old City Light Show

A bit further along was a very creative video display called Living Book Shelf. I enjoyed how the video created 3d effects by using light, shadow, and the architectural features of the building the video was projected on.

Unfortunately, I was so taken by the video I neglected to take a photo.

After finishing the White Line we were able to swim against the tide and make our way to Shaar Tzion for the start of the Red Line.

The Red Line was outside the wall of the Old City from Shaar Tzion to Shaar Yafo.

My favorite display along the Red Line were the Blue Circles.

Blue Circles

The Blue Circles are a group of about 100 circles of various sizes and shades on the wall of the Old City. The circles are turned on and off in various patterns.

As I mentioned before, we’ve been attending the Jerusalem Old City Light Show every year since 2012.

In 2012 there was a light dome built in the plaza outside Shaar Yafo that to me symbolizes the Jerusalem Light Show.

light-dome

The Jewish people are meant to be a light to the whole world. No, the prophet did not have an electric light show in mind. But, the Jerusalem Old City Light Show is still a fun way to enjoy the Old City and see the creativity of talented artists on display.

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You Are NOT Charlie http://thinkingtorah.com/you-are-not-charlie/ http://thinkingtorah.com/you-are-not-charlie/#comments Sun, 11 Jan 2015 19:25:44 +0000 http://thinkingtorah.com/?p=1790 It didn’t take long for the wannabes to claim the mantle of daring journalism. It seems it took only a few hours until the saying Je Suis Charlie showed up on Twitter and tee shirts. I understand why the media outlets are so upset by the attack on Charlie Hebdo. They view the attack as […]

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It didn’t take long for the wannabes to claim the mantle of daring journalism. It seems it took only a few hours until the saying Je Suis Charlie showed up on Twitter and tee shirts.

I understand why the media outlets are so upset by the attack on Charlie Hebdo. They view the attack as being against all journalists.

Therefore, they will wring their hands about this terrorist attack much more than they do when Jews in Israel are murdered.

All I can say is: “Baloney!”

You are NOT Charlie.

What have you done to champion free speech against those who would vilify you? And maybe kill you?

Not so many weeks ago there was a movement on the UC Berkeley campus to block Bill Maher from speaking. What was his crime? He’d dared to be critical of Islam.

Whose side did you take in that issue?

Free Speech? Depends Where

Let’s continue to look at US college campuses.

Does your local college have a “speech code” or a designated “free speech” area on campus?

What have you done to fight this blatant violation of the the First Amendment?

Some college students have been harassed or worse because they tried to distribute literature outside of the “free speech” area on their campus.

In one very poignant case, a student was stopped from distributing the US Constitution. On Constitution Day!

Stolen Valor

There’s a concept that’s gotten a bit of publicity recently known as “stolen valor.”

Stolen valor is when a person who has not served in the US Armed Forces tries to be honored as a service member by wearing, for example, an Army uniform.

Many people appreciate the service performed by those men and women who volunteer to serve in the military. They will treat them with respect and deference when they see them. Some businesses offer soldiers wearing their uniforms discounts.

You will now find some low-lifes who try to take advantage of this and wear a military uniform that they have not earned the right to wear.

Stolen valor.

Je suis Charlie

I say, if you haven’t been on the front lines of the fight for freedom of the press, then you haven’t earned the right to proclaim “Je suis Charlie.”

Rather, find a tag line you can rightfully claim. It seems there are plenty of other aspects of Western culture that infuriate the Muslim terrorists around the world.

For myself, here’s what I claim:

Je suis Americain. I am an American.

Je suis Israelien. I am an Israeli.

Je suis Juif. I am a Jew.

 
Picture Credit: From the Charlie Hebdo website CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication
 

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Butler and Baker http://thinkingtorah.com/butler-and-baker/ http://thinkingtorah.com/butler-and-baker/#comments Thu, 11 Dec 2014 15:00:20 +0000 http://thinkingtorah.com/?p=1778 Vayeishev 5775 This week’s parasha ends with Yosef in prison. He’s been a model prisoner and has been put in charge of all the other prisoners. Then Paro gets angry with his chief butler and chief baker and throws them into the same prison with Yosef. One night the butler and baker have dreams that […]

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Vayeishev 5775

This week’s parasha ends with Yosef in prison.

He’s been a model prisoner and has been put in charge of all the other prisoners.

Then Paro gets angry with his chief butler and chief baker and throws them into the same prison with Yosef.

One night the butler and baker have dreams that leave them troubled.

Yosef interprets the dreams and his interpretation comes to pass a few days later.

Why Different Interpretations?

That’s the basic story.

One thing that bothers a lot of people is why did Yosef interpret one dream in a positive way and the other in a negative way.

One the surface the dreams seem very similar.

Why not give them both a positive spin?

The Text

Here’s the relevant text of each dream. I’m using the translation from The Rashi Chumash.

Chief Butler

Bereshit 40
9 And the chief butler told his dream to Joseph, saying to him: In my dream, behold, a grapevine before me.

10 And on the grapevine, three shoots, which seemed to bud. And its blossom sprouted; and its cluster brought forth grapes.

11 And Pharaoh’s goblet was in my hand. And I took the grapes and squeezed them into Pharaoh’s goblet; and I placed the goblet on Pharaoh’s hand.

Chief Baker

Bereshit 40
16 And the chief baker saw that he had interpreted well, and he said to Joseph: I, too, in my dream; and, behold, three wicker baskets on my head.

17 And in the top basket, of all the food of Pharaoh, the work of a baker. And the birds ate them from the basket on my head.

The Butler’s Good Interpretation

The butler’s dream opens with a grapevine. A grapevine by itself is neutral.

With Noach he planted grapevines and then became drunk with disastrous results.

On the other hand, in Tehillim 104:15 wine is praised because it “gladdens man’s heart.”

In verse 10, as the butler watches, the grapevine begins to fulfill its potential as it bring forth shoots, blossoms, and finally grapes.

Then in verse 11 the butler is active. He takes, he squeezes, he places the goblet in Paro’s hand. The butler is clearly fulfilling his role in the royal palace.

In fact, he’s perhaps even going beyond his normal role. I assume that normally he only served the wine. In his dream he is also depicted as one who actively makes the wine.

My key take away here is that the butler is active and fulfilling his potential.

The Baker’s Bad Interpretation

However, the baker is not at all active in his dream.

In his dream he sees himself with wicker baskets on his head.

A wicker basket is not very elegant. I would assume that Paro would not have his food brought to his table in a mere wicker basket.

The basket is filled with Paro’s food. That’s a good sign. But, it’s only called “the work of a baker.” It’s not identified as the work of the chief baker.

Finally, the food is destroyed by birds. Even if it wasn’t destroyed, could it be brought to Paro after birds had pecked at it?

Also, the fact that birds ate the food indicate that the birds were not afraid of the chief baker. In general, birds will not come close to a living person.

Unlike the butler, the chief baker is not active and he is not fulfilling his normal role. In fact, by seeing himself as carrying bread on his head, he’s not acting like a baker at all.

As you can see at Shuk Machne Yehuda, it’s not the bakers who are carrying bread and other baked goods to the stalls for sale. All of the carrying is done by ordinary delivery boys.

Conclusion

There was good reason for Yosef to see a bright future for the chief butler because he was active in his dream doing his normal work.

However, the chief baker already appeared to be so lifeless that even the birds were not afraid of him.

 

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Rachel and Leah http://thinkingtorah.com/rachel-and-leah/ http://thinkingtorah.com/rachel-and-leah/#comments Thu, 27 Nov 2014 11:55:13 +0000 http://thinkingtorah.com/?p=1628 Vayeitze 5775 It’s easy to detect the competition between Rachel and Leah for Yaakov’s affections in Parashat Vayeitze. Though Yaakov married both sisters, it’s clear that Rachel was his favorite. Look at Bereshit 29 (Artscroll translation): After giving birth to four sons, Leah stopped having children. Dudaim In Bereshit 30:14-15 the Torah records the incident […]

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Vayeitze 5775

It’s easy to detect the competition between Rachel and Leah for Yaakov’s affections in Parashat Vayeitze.

Though Yaakov married both sisters, it’s clear that Rachel was his favorite.

Look at Bereshit 29 (Artscroll translation):

30 He consorted also with Rachel and loved Rachel even more than Leah; and he worked for him yet another seven years.
31 Hashem saw that Leah was unloved, so He opened her womb; but Rachel remained barren.

After giving birth to four sons, Leah stopped having children.

Dudaim

In Bereshit 30:14-15 the Torah records the incident of Reuvain (Leah’s oldest son) finding the dudaim. Rachel asks for some. Leah gives them to her in trade for the opportunity to sleep with Yaakov that night.

Leah is rewarded:

Bereshit 30:17 God hearkened [Hebrew: shin mem ayin] to Leah; and she conceived and bore Jacob a fifth son.

Finally, Rachel has a son:

Bereshit 30:22 God remembered [Hebrew: zayin kaf reish] Rachel; God hearkened [Hebrew: shin mem ayin] to her and He opened her womb.

Notice that Rachel requires both God’s remembering and hearkening.

Even though Leah had come to a point in her life where she was no longer bearing children, she only required God’s hearkening before she had another child.

No doubt, both women were praying to God to have children.

But, Rachel had been pushed so far to the side that before her prayer could be answered she needed God to first “remember” her.

Rosh Hashanah Musaf

In our musaf tefillot on Rosh HaShanah we mention three major themes: God’s kingship, His remembering, and the sound of the shofar.

Here are the verses from the Torah that we say during musaf about God’s remembering:

Bereshit 8:1 God remembered Noah and all the beasts and all the animals that were with him in the ark
 
Shemot 2:24 God heard their moaning, and God remembered His covenant with Abraham, with Isaac, and with Jacob.
 
Vayikra 26:42 I will remember My covenant with Jacob and also My covenant with Isaac, and also My covenant with Abraham I will remember, and I will remember the Land.

Of course, God does not forget and later suddenly recall something.

The idea of remembering is as if God brings that person to the front of His mind.

All of the verses from the Rosh HaShanah musaf deal with a situation where a group has been exiled. That is, they are taken away from what is natural and put in a difficult situation. Then, God remembers them and they are redeemed.

So too with Rachel. She had been “exiled” when God closed her womb, because the natural status of a young woman is to be able to bear children.

When it is time for her to finally have children, God remembers her and hears her prays and opens her womb.

By way of contrast, Leah was never “exiled” so God did not have to first remember her.

Picture credit: Jacob greets Rachel
 

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IDF and Religion http://thinkingtorah.com/idf-and-religion/ http://thinkingtorah.com/idf-and-religion/#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 13:57:34 +0000 http://thinkingtorah.com/?p=1618 The modern State of Israel continues to struggle with its identity. Is this a Jewish State or a state where some Jews happen to live? I’ve seen two manifestations of this problem already this week. Yesterday it was the Jewish State bill. One argument about that bill is whether to emphasize the Jewish nature of […]

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The modern State of Israel continues to struggle with its identity.

Is this a Jewish State or a state where some Jews happen to live?

I’ve seen two manifestations of this problem already this week.

Yesterday it was the Jewish State bill. One argument about that bill is whether to emphasize the Jewish nature of Israel or its democratic nature. (As an aside, I’m almost 100% certain that most Israelis have no clue what democracy means.)

Now there are reports in Arutz 7 that some Kenesset members are upset that soldiers in the IDF are “too” religious.

In an open discussion held by the Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee’s Subcommittee for Personnel in the IDF on Monday [November 24], the Knesset looked into the phenomenon that saw numerous IDF units visiting the Kotel (Western Wall) and other Jewish sites during the operation [Operation Protective Edge]. The Knesset session was surprisingly framed as a talk about “religious radicalization.”

I’ve been under the impression that all new recruits to the IDF hold ceremonies at the Kotel. And all of them are given a Tanach.

That’s already pretty radical.

One of the topics to be raised in the discussion was the message sent by Givati Brigade Commander Col. Ofer Winter to his troops at the start of the operation, in which he wrote the brigade was going out against “the terrorist Gazan enemy that curses, reviles and insults the G-d of the campaigns of Israel.”

The invocation of G-d made a stir in the media, and led Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon (Likud) to criticize Winter, noting not all IDF soldiers are religious, or even Jewish.

I’ll point out to the Defense Minister that even though not all soldiers are religious, and not all of them are Jewish, our enemies in Gaza wanted them all dead, along with all the rest of the Jewish people.

Any soldier who felt left out by Col. Winter’s message should go find another country to live in.

In addition, Minister Ya’alon and the Kenesset should spend their time rethinking the idea of warning our enemies where the next attack is coming. That “humanitarian” tactic killed more IDF soldiers than any trips to the Kotel.

Picture credit:
Flickr – IDF Online

 

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